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Precise navigation surgery of tumours in the lung in mouse models enabled by in situ fluorescence labelling with a killer-reporter adenovirus
  1. Shuya Yano1,2,3,
  2. Yong Zhang1,
  3. Shinji Miwa1,2,
  4. Hiroyuki Kishimoto3,
  5. Yasuo Urata4,
  6. Michael Bouvet2,
  7. Shunsuke Kagawa3,
  8. Toshiyoshi Fujiwara3 and
  9. Robert M Hoffman1,2
  1. 1AntiCancer, Inc., San Diego, California, USA
  2. 2Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego, California, USA
  3. 3Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan
  4. 4Oncolys BioPharm Inc., Tokyo, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Robert M Hoffman; all{at}anticancer.com

Abstract

Background Current methods of image-guided surgery of tumours of the lung mostly rely on CT. A sensitive procedure of selective tumour fluorescence labelling would allow simple and high-resolution visualisation of the tumour for precise surgical navigation.

Methods Human lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549 were genetically transformed to express red fluorescent protein (RFP). Tumours were grown subcutaneously for each cell line and harvested and minced for surgical orthotopic implantation on the left lung of nude mice. Tumour growth was measured by fluorescence imaging. After the tumours reached 5 mm in diameter, they were injected under fluorescence guidance with the telomerase-dependent green fluorescent protein (GFP)-containing adenovirus, OBP-401. Viral labelling of the lung tumours with GFP precisely colocalised with tumour RFP expression. Three days after administration of OBP-401, fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) was performed.

Results FGS of tumours in the lung was enabled by labelling with a telomerase-dependent adenovirus containing the GFP gene. Tumours in the lung were selectively and brightly labelled. FGS enabled complete lung tumour resection with no residual fluorescent tumour.

Conclusions FGS of tumours in the lung is feasible and more effective than bright-light surgery.

  • Lung Cancer
  • Thoracic Surgery
  • Imaging/CT MRI etc
  • Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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